Transfer Learning with Dynamic Distribution Adaptation

Transfer learning aims to learn robust classifiers for the target domain by leveraging knowledge from a source domain. Since the source and the target domains are usually from different distributions, existing methods mainly focus on adapting the cross-domain marginal or conditional distributions. However, in real applications, the marginal and conditional distributions usually have different contributions to the domain discrepancy. Existing methods fail to quantitatively evaluate the different importance of these two distributions, which will result in unsatisfactory transfer performance. In this paper, we propose a novel concept called Dynamic Distribution Adaptation (DDA), which is capable of quantitatively evaluating the relative importance of each distribution. DDA can be easily incorporated into the framework of structural risk minimization to solve transfer learning problems. On the basis of DDA, we propose two novel learning algorithms: (1) Manifold Dynamic Distribution Adaptation (MDDA) for traditional transfer learning, and (2) Dynamic Distribution Adaptation Network (DDAN) for deep transfer learning. Extensive experiments demonstrate that MDDA and DDAN significantly improve the transfer learning performance and setup a strong baseline over the latest deep and adversarial methods on digits recognition, sentiment analysis, and image classification. More importantly, it is shown that marginal and conditional distributions have different contributions to the domain divergence, and our DDA is able to provide good quantitative evaluation of their relative importance which leads to better performance. We believe this observation can be helpful for future research in transfer learning.


Conformal Prediction based Spectral Clustering

Spectral Clustering(SC) is a prominent data clustering technique of recent times which has attracted much attention from researchers. It is a highly data-driven method and makes no strict assumptions on the structure of the data to be clustered. One of the central pieces of spectral clustering is the construction of an affinity matrix based on a similarity measure between data points. The way the similarity measure is defined between data points has a direct impact on the performance of the SC technique. Several attempts have been made in the direction of strengthening the pairwise similarity measure to enhance the spectral clustering. In this work, we have defined a novel affinity measure by employing the concept of non-conformity used in Conformal Prediction(CP) framework. The non-conformity based affinity captures the relationship between neighborhoods of data points and has the power to generalize the notion of contextual similarity. We have shown that this formulation of affinity measure gives good results and compares well with the state of the art methods.


Learning to Generate Questions with Adaptive Copying Neural Networks

Automatic question generation is an important problem in natural language processing. In this paper we propose a novel adaptive copying recurrent neural network model to tackle the problem of question generation from sentences and paragraphs. The proposed model adds a copying mechanism component onto a bidirectional LSTM architecture to generate more suitable questions adaptively from the input data. Our experimental results show the proposed model can outperform the state-of-the-art question generation methods in terms of BLEU and ROUGE evaluation scores.


Measure Contribution of Participants in Federated Learning

Federated Machine Learning (FML) creates an ecosystem for multiple parties to collaborate on building models while protecting data privacy for the participants. A measure of the contribution for each party in FML enables fair credits allocation. In this paper we develop simple but powerful techniques to fairly calculate the contributions of multiple parties in FML, in the context of both horizontal FML and vertical FML. For Horizontal FML we use deletion method to calculate the grouped instance influence. For Vertical FML we use Shapley Values to calculate the grouped feature importance. Our methods open the door for research in model contribution and credit allocation in the context of federated machine learning.


K-BERT: Enabling Language Representation with Knowledge Graph

Pre-trained language representation models, such as BERT, capture a general language representation from large-scale corpora, but lack domain-specific knowledge. When reading a domain text, experts make inferences with relevant knowledge. For machines to achieve this capability, we propose a knowledge-enabled language representation model (K-BERT) with knowledge graphs (KGs), in which triples are injected into the sentences as domain knowledge. However, too much knowledge incorporation may divert the sentence from its correct meaning, which is called knowledge noise (KN) issue. To overcome KN, K-BERT introduces soft-position and visible matrix to limit the impact of knowledge. K-BERT can easily inject domain knowledge into the models by equipped with a KG without pre-training by-self because it is capable of loading model parameters from the pre-trained BERT. Our investigation reveals promising results in twelve NLP tasks. Especially in domain-specific tasks (including finance, law, and medicine), K-BERT significantly outperforms BERT, which demonstrates that K-BERT is an excellent choice for solving the knowledge-driven problems that require experts.


AdaFair: Cumulative Fairness Adaptive Boosting

The widespread use of ML-based decision making in domains with high societal impact such as recidivism, job hiring and loan credit has raised a lot of concerns regarding potential discrimination. In particular, in certain cases it has been observed that ML algorithms can provide different decisions based on sensitive attributes such as gender or race and therefore can lead to discrimination. Although, several fairness-aware ML approaches have been proposed, their focus has been largely on preserving the overall classification accuracy while improving fairness in predictions for both protected and non-protected groups (defined based on the sensitive attribute(s)). The overall accuracy however is not a good indicator of performance in case of class imbalance, as it is biased towards the majority class. As we will see in our experiments, many of the fairness-related datasets suffer from class imbalance and therefore, tackling fairness requires also tackling the imbalance problem. To this end, we propose AdaFair, a fairness-aware classifier based on AdaBoost that further updates the weights of the instances in each boosting round taking into account a cumulative notion of fairness based upon all current ensemble members, while explicitly tackling class-imbalance by optimizing the number of ensemble members for balanced classification error. Our experiments show that our approach can achieve parity in true positive and true negative rates for both protected and non-protected groups, while it significantly outperforms existing fairness-aware methods up to 25% in terms of balanced error.


K-TanH: Hardware Efficient Activations For Deep Learning

We propose K-TanH, a novel, highly accurate, hardware efficient approximation of popular activation function Tanh for Deep Learning. K-TanH consists of a sequence of parameterized bit/integer operations, such as, masking, shift and add/subtract (no floating point operation needed) where parameters are stored in a very small look-up table. The design of K-TanH is flexible enough to deal with multiple numerical formats, such as, FP32 and BFloat16. High quality approximations to other activation functions, e.g., Swish and GELU, can be derived from K-TanH. We provide RTL design for K-TanH to demonstrate its area/power/performance efficacy. It is more accurate than existing piecewise approximations for Tanh. For example, K-TanH achieves \sim 5\times speed up and > 6\times reduction in maximum approximation error over software implementation of Hard TanH. Experimental results for low-precision BFloat16 training of language translation model GNMT on WMT16 data sets with approximate Tanh and Sigmoid obtained via K-TanH achieve similar accuracy and convergence as training with exact Tanh and Sigmoid.


Multi Sense Embeddings from Topic Models

Distributed word embeddings have yielded state-of-the-art performance in many NLP tasks, mainly due to their success in capturing useful semantic information. These representations assign only a single vector to each word whereas a large number of words are polysemous (i.e., have multiple meanings). In this work, we approach this critical problem in lexical semantics, namely that of representing various senses of polysemous words in vector spaces. We propose a topic modeling based skip-gram approach for learning multi-prototype word embeddings. We also introduce a method to prune the embeddings determined by the probabilistic representation of the word in each topic. We use our embeddings to show that they can capture the context and word similarity strongly and outperform various state-of-the-art implementations.


!MDP Playground: Meta-Features in Reinforcement Learning

Reinforcement Learning (RL) algorithms usually assume their environment to be a Markov Decision Process (MDP). Additionally, they do not try to identify specific features of environments which could help them perform better. Here, we present a few key meta-features of environments: delayed rewards, specific reward sequences, sparsity of rewards, and stochasticity of environments, which may violate the MDP assumptions and adapting to which should help RL agents perform better. While it is very time consuming to run RL algorithms on standard benchmarks, we define a parameterised collection of fast-to-run toy benchmarks in OpenAI Gym by varying these meta-features. Despite their toy nature and low compute requirements, we show that these benchmarks present substantial difficulties to current RL algorithms. Furthermore, since we can generate environments with a desired value for each of the meta-features, we have fine-grained control over the environments’ difficulty and also have the ground truth available for evaluating algorithms. We believe that devising algorithms that can detect such meta-features of environments and adapt to them will be key to creating robust RL algorithms that work in a variety of different real-world problems.


Span-based Joint Entity and Relation Extraction with Transformer Pre-training

We introduce SpERT, an attention model for span-based joint entity and relation extraction. Our approach employs the pre-trained Transformer network BERT as its core. We use BERT embeddings as shared inputs for a light-weight reasoning, which features entity recognition and filtering, as well as relation classification with a localized, marker-free context representation. The model is trained on strong within-sentence negative samples, which are efficiently extracted in a single BERT pass. These aspects facilitate a search over all spans in the sentence. In ablation studies, we demonstrate the benefits of pre-training, strong negative sampling and localized context. Our model outperforms prior work by up to 5% F1 score on several datasets for joint entity and relation extraction.


Global Optimal Path-Based Clustering Algorithm

Combinatorial optimization problems for clustering are known to be NP-hard. Most optimization methods are not able to find the global optimum solution for all datasets. To solve this problem, we propose a global optimal path-based clustering (GOPC) algorithm in this paper. The GOPC algorithm is based on two facts: (1) medoids have the minimum degree in their clusters; (2) the minimax distance between two objects in one cluster is smaller than the minimax distance between objects in different clusters. Extensive experiments are conducted on synthetic and real-world datasets to evaluate the performance of the GOPC algorithm. The results on synthetic datasets show that the GOPC algorithm can recognize all kinds of clusters regardless of their shapes, sizes, or densities. Experimental results on real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the GOPC algorithm. In addition, the GOPC algorithm needs only one parameter, i.e., the number of clusters, which can be estimated by the decision graph. The advantages mentioned above make GOPC a good candidate as a general clustering algorithm. Codes are available at https://…/Clustering.


Character-Centric Storytelling

Sequential vision-to-language or visual storytelling has recently been one of the areas of focus in computer vision and language modeling domains. Though existing models generate narratives that read subjectively well, there could be cases when these models miss out on generating stories that account and address all prospective human and animal characters in the image sequences. Considering this scenario, we propose a model that implicitly learns relationships between provided characters and thereby generates stories with respective characters in scope. We use the VIST dataset for this purpose and report numerous statistics on the dataset. Eventually, we describe the model, explain the experiment and discuss our current status and future work.


sktime: A Unified Interface for Machine Learning with Time Series

We present sktime — a new scikit-learn compatible Python library with a unified interface for machine learning with time series. Time series data gives rise to various distinct but closely related learning tasks, such as forecasting and time series classification, many of which can be solved by reducing them to related simpler tasks. We discuss the main rationale for creating a unified interface, including reduction, as well as the design of sktime’s core API, supported by a clear overview of common time series tasks and reduction approaches.


Generating Black-Box Adversarial Examples for Text Classifiers Using a Deep Reinforced Model

Recently, generating adversarial examples has become an important means of measuring robustness of a deep learning model. Adversarial examples help us identify the susceptibilities of the model and further counter those vulnerabilities by applying adversarial training techniques. In natural language domain, small perturbations in the form of misspellings or paraphrases can drastically change the semantics of the text. We propose a reinforcement learning based approach towards generating adversarial examples in black-box settings. We demonstrate that our method is able to fool well-trained models for (a) IMDB sentiment classification task and (b) AG’s news corpus news categorization task with significantly high success rates. We find that the adversarial examples generated are semantics-preserving perturbations to the original text.


Ludwig: a type-based declarative deep learning toolbox

In this work we present Ludwig, a flexible, extensible and easy to use toolbox which allows users to train deep learning models and use them for obtaining predictions without writing code. Ludwig implements a novel approach to deep learning model building based on two main abstractions: data types and declarative configuration files. The data type abstraction allows for easier code and sub-model reuse, and the standardized interfaces imposed by this abstraction allow for encapsulation and make the code easy to extend. Declarative model definition configuration files enable inexperienced users to obtain effective models and increase the productivity of expert users. Alongside these two innovations, Ludwig introduces a general modularized deep learning architecture called Encoder-Combiner-Decoder that can be instantiated to perform a vast amount of machine learning tasks. These innovations make it possible for engineers, scientists from other fields and, in general, a much broader audience to adopt deep learning models for their tasks, concretely helping in its democratization.


Do NLP Models Know Numbers? Probing Numeracy in Embeddings

The ability to understand and work with numbers (numeracy) is critical for many complex reasoning tasks. Currently, most NLP models treat numbers in text in the same way as other tokens—they embed them as distributed vectors. Is this enough to capture numeracy? We begin by investigating the numerical reasoning capabilities of a state-of-the-art question answering model on the DROP dataset. We find this model excels on questions that require numerical reasoning, i.e., it already captures numeracy. To understand how this capability emerges, we probe token embedding methods (e.g., BERT, GloVe) on synthetic list maximum, number decoding, and addition tasks. A surprising degree of numeracy is naturally present in standard embeddings. For example, GloVe and word2vec accurately encode magnitude for numbers up to 1,000. Furthermore, character-level embeddings are even more precise—ELMo captures numeracy the best for all pre-trained methods—but BERT, which uses sub-word units, is less exact.


BLOCCS: Block Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis With Application To Interpretable Omics Integration

We introduce Block Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis which estimates multiple pairs of canonical directions (together a ‘block’) at once, resulting in significantly improved orthogonality of the sparse directions which, we demonstrate, translates to more interpretable solutions. Our approach builds on the sparse CCA method of (Solari, Brown, and Bickel 2019) in that we also express the bi-convex objective of our block formulation as a concave minimization problem over an orthogonal k-frame in a unit Euclidean ball, which in turn, due to concavity of the objective, is shrunk to a Stiefel manifold, which is optimized via gradient descent algorithm. Our simulations show that our method outperforms existing sCCA algorithms and implementations in terms of computational cost and stability, mainly due to the drastic shrinkage of our search space, and the correlation within and orthogonality between pairs of estimated canonical covariates. Finally, we apply our method, available as an R-package called BLOCCS, to multi-omic data on Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma(LUSC) obtained via The Cancer Genome Atlas, and demonstrate its capability in capturing meaningful biological associations relevant to the hypothesis under study rather than spurious dominant variations.


ProtoGAN: Towards Few Shot Learning for Action Recognition

Few-shot learning (FSL) for action recognition is a challenging task of recognizing novel action categories which are represented by few instances in the training data. In a more generalized FSL setting (G-FSL), both seen as well as novel action categories need to be recognized. Conventional classifiers suffer due to inadequate data in FSL setting and inherent bias towards seen action categories in G-FSL setting. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a novel ProtoGAN framework which synthesizes additional examples for novel categories by conditioning a conditional generative adversarial network with class prototype vectors. These class prototype vectors are learnt using a Class Prototype Transfer Network (CPTN) from examples of seen categories. Our synthesized examples for a novel class are semantically similar to real examples belonging to that class and is used to train a model exhibiting better generalization towards novel classes. We support our claim by performing extensive experiments on three datasets: UCF101, HMDB51 and Olympic-Sports. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report the results for G-FSL and provide a strong benchmark for future research. We also outperform the state-of-the-art method in FSL for all the aforementioned datasets.


Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis via Concave Minimization

A new approach to the sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis (sCCA)is proposed with the aim of discovering interpretable associations in very high-dimensional multi-view, i.e.observations of multiple sets of variables on the same subjects, problems. Inspired by the sparse PCA approach of Journee et al. (2010), we also show that the sparse CCA formulation, while non-convex, is equivalent to a maximization program of a convex objective over a compact set for which we propose a first-order gradient method. This result helps us reduce the search space drastically to the boundaries of the set. Consequently, we propose a two-step algorithm, where we first infer the sparsity pattern of the canonical directions using our fast algorithm, then we shrink each view, i.e. observations of a set of covariates, to contain observations on the sets of covariates selected in the previous step, and compute their canonical directions via any CCA algorithm. We also introduceDirected Sparse CCA, which is able to find associations which are aligned with a specified experiment design, andMulti-View sCCA which is used to discover associations between multiple sets of covariates. Our simulations establish the superior convergence properties and computational efficiency of our algorithm as well as accuracy in terms of the canonical correlation and its ability to recover the supports of the canonical directions. We study the associations between metabolomics, trasncriptomics and microbiomics in a multi-omic study usingMuLe, which is an R-package that implements our approach, in order to form hypotheses on mechanisms of adaptations of Drosophila Melanogaster to high doses of environmental toxicants, specifically Atrazine, which is a commonly used chemical fertilizer.


Interpretable Principal Components Analysis for Multilevel Multivariate Functional Data, with Application to EEG Experiments

Many studies collect functional data from multiple subjects that have both multilevel and multivariate structures. An example of such data comes from popular neuroscience experiments where participants’ brain activity is recorded using modalities such as EEG and summarized as power within multiple time-varying frequency bands within multiple electrodes, or brain regions. Summarizing the joint variation across multiple frequency bands for both whole-brain variability between subjects, as well as location-variation within subjects, can help to explain neural reactions to stimuli. This article introduces a novel approach to conducting interpretable principal components analysis on multilevel multivariate functional data that decomposes total variation into subject-level and replicate-within-subject-level (i.e. electrode-level) variation, and provides interpretable components that can be both sparse among variates (e.g. frequency bands) and have localized support over time within each frequency band. The sparsity and localization of components is achieved by solving an innovative rank-one based convex optimization problem with block Frobenius and matrix L_1-norm based penalties. The method is used to analyze data from a study to better understand reactions to emotional information in individuals with histories of trauma and the symptom of dissociation, revealing new neurophysiological insights into how subject- and electrode-level brain activity are associated with these phenomena.


Heterogeneity-Aware Asynchronous Decentralized Training

Distributed deep learning training usually adopts All-Reduce as the synchronization mechanism for data parallel algorithms due to its high performance in homogeneous environment. However, its performance is bounded by the slowest worker among all workers, and is significantly slower in heterogeneous situations. AD-PSGD, a newly proposed synchronization method which provides numerically fast convergence and heterogeneity tolerance, suffers from deadlock issues and high synchronization overhead. Is it possible to get the best of both worlds – designing a distributed training method that has both high performance as All-Reduce in homogeneous environment and good heterogeneity tolerance as AD-PSGD? In this paper, we propose Ripples, a high-performance heterogeneity-aware asynchronous decentralized training approach. We achieve the above goal with intensive synchronization optimization, emphasizing the interplay between algorithm and system implementation. To reduce synchronization cost, we propose a novel communication primitive Partial All-Reduce that allows a large group of workers to synchronize quickly. To reduce synchronization conflict, we propose static group scheduling in homogeneous environment and simple techniques (Group Buffer and Group Division) to avoid conflicts with slightly reduced randomness. Our experiments show that in homogeneous environment, Ripples is 1.1 times faster than the state-of-the-art implementation of All-Reduce, 5.1 times faster than Parameter Server and 4.3 times faster than AD-PSGD. In a heterogeneous setting, Ripples shows 2 times speedup over All-Reduce, and still obtains 3 times speedup over the Parameter Server baseline.


Megatron-LM: Training Multi-Billion Parameter Language Models Using GPU Model Parallelism

Recent work in unsupervised language modeling demonstrates that training large neural language models advances the state of the art in Natural Language Processing applications. However, for very large models, memory constraints limit the size of models that can be practically trained. Model parallelism allows us to train larger models, because the parameters can be split across multiple processors. In this work, we implement a simple, efficient intra-layer model parallel approach that enables training state of the art transformer language models with billions of parameters. Our approach does not require a new compiler or library changes, is orthogonal and complimentary to pipeline model parallelism, and can be fully implemented with the insertion of a few communication operations in native PyTorch. We illustrate this approach by converging an 8.3 billion parameter transformer language model using 512 GPUs, making it the largest transformer model ever trained at 24x times the size of BERT and 5.6x times the size of GPT-2. We sustain up to 15.1 PetaFLOPs per second across the entire application with 76% scaling efficiency, compared to a strong single processor baseline that sustains 39 TeraFLOPs per second, which is 30% of peak FLOPs. The model is trained on 174GB of text, requiring 12 ZettaFLOPs over 9.2 days to converge. Transferring this language model achieves state of the art (SOTA) results on the WikiText103 (10.8 compared to SOTA perplexity of 16.4) and LAMBADA (66.5% compared to SOTA accuracy of 63.2%) datasets. We release training and evaluation code, as well as the weights of our smaller portable model, for reproducibility.


Adversarial Attacks and Defenses in Images, Graphs and Text: A Review

Deep neural networks (DNN) have achieved unprecedented success in numerous machine learning tasks in various domains. However, the existence of adversarial examples raises our concerns in adopting deep learning to safety-critical applications. As a result, we have witnessed increasing interests in studying attack and defense mechanisms for DNN models on different data types, such as images, graphs and text. Thus, it is necessary to provide a systematic and comprehensive overview of the main threats of attacks and the success of corresponding countermeasures. In this survey, we review the state of the art algorithms for generating adversarial examples and the countermeasures against adversarial examples, for three most popular data types, including images, graphs and text.


Relaxed Softmax for learning from Positive and Unlabeled data

In recent years, the softmax model and its fast approximations have become the de-facto loss functions for deep neural networks when dealing with multi-class prediction. This loss has been extended to language modeling and recommendation, two fields that fall into the framework of learning from Positive and Unlabeled data. In this paper, we stress the different drawbacks of the current family of softmax losses and sampling schemes when applied in a Positive and Unlabeled learning setup. We propose both a Relaxed Softmax loss (RS) and a new negative sampling scheme based on Boltzmann formulation. We show that the new training objective is better suited for the tasks of density estimation, item similarity and next-event prediction by driving uplifts in performance on textual and recommendation datasets against classical softmax.


A Distributed Fair Machine Learning Framework with Private Demographic Data Protection

Fair machine learning has become a significant research topic with broad societal impact. However, most fair learning methods require direct access to personal demographic data, which is increasingly restricted to use for protecting user privacy (e.g. by the EU General Data Protection Regulation). In this paper, we propose a distributed fair learning framework for protecting the privacy of demographic data. We assume this data is privately held by a third party, which can communicate with the data center (responsible for model development) without revealing the demographic information. We propose a principled approach to design fair learning methods under this framework, exemplify four methods and show they consistently outperform their existing counterparts in both fairness and accuracy across three real-world data sets. We theoretically analyze the framework, and prove it can learn models with high fairness or high accuracy, with their trade-offs balanced by a threshold variable.


Ensemble Knowledge Distillation for Learning Improved and Efficient Networks

Ensemble models comprising of deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) have shown significant improvements in model generalization but at the cost of large computation and memory requirements. % In this paper, we present a framework for learning compact CNN models with improved classification performance and model generalization. For this, we propose a CNN architecture of a compact student model with parallel branches which are trained using ground truth labels and information from high capacity teacher networks in an ensemble learning fashion. Our framework provides two main benefits: i) Distilling knowledge from different teachers into the student network promotes heterogeneity in feature learning at different branches of the student network and enables the network to learn diverse solutions to the target problem. ii) Coupling the branches of the student network through ensembling encourages collaboration and improves the quality of the final predictions by reducing variance in the network outputs. % Experiments on the well established CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100 datasets show that our Ensemble Knowledge Distillation (EKD) improves classification accuracy and model generalization especially in situations with limited training data. Experiments also show that our EKD based compact networks outperform in terms of mean accuracy on the test datasets compared to state-of-the-art knowledge distillation based methods.


Inference on the change point with the jump size near the boundary of the region of detectability in high dimensional time series models

We develop a projected least squares estimator for the change point parameter in a high dimensional time series model with a potential change point. Importantly we work under the setup where the jump size may be near the boundary of the region of detectability. The proposed methodology yields an optimal rate of convergence despite high dimensionality of the assumed model and a potentially diminishing jump size. The limiting distribution of this estimate is derived, thereby allowing construction of a confidence interval for the location of the change point. A secondary near optimal estimate is proposed which is required for the implementation of the optimal projected least squares estimate. The prestep estimation procedure is designed to also agnostically detect the case where no change point exists, thereby removing the need to pretest for the existence of a change point for the implementation of the inference methodology. Our results are presented under a general positive definite spatial dependence setup, assuming no special structure on this dependence. The proposed methodology is designed to be highly scalable, and applicable to very large data. Theoretical results regarding detection and estimation consistency and the limiting distribution are numerically supported via monte carlo simulations.
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