Metatrace google
Reinforcement learning (RL) has had many successes in both ‘deep’ and ‘shallow’ settings. In both cases, significant hyperparameter tuning is often required to achieve good performance. Furthermore, when nonlinear function approximation is used, non-stationarity in the state representation can lead to learning instability. A variety of techniques exist to combat this — most notably large experience replay buffers or the use of multiple parallel actors. These techniques come at the cost of moving away from the online RL problem as it is traditionally formulated (i.e., a single agent learning online without maintaining a large database of training examples). Meta-learning can potentially help with both these issues by tuning hyperparameters online and allowing the algorithm to more robustly adjust to non-stationarity in a problem. This paper applies meta-gradient descent to derive a set of step-size tuning algorithms specifically for online RL control with eligibility traces. Our novel technique, Metatrace, makes use of an eligibility trace analogous to methods like $TD(\lambda)$. We explore tuning both a single scalar step-size and a separate step-size for each learned parameter. We evaluate Metatrace first for control with linear function approximation in the classic mountain car problem and then in a noisy, non-stationary version. Finally, we apply Metatrace for control with nonlinear function approximation in 5 games in the Arcade Learning Environment where we explore how it impacts learning speed and robustness to initial step-size choice. Results show that the meta-step-size parameter of Metatrace is easy to set, Metatrace can speed learning, and Metatrace can allow an RL algorithm to deal with non-stationarity in the learning task. …

LemmaTag google
We present LemmaTag, a featureless recurrent neural network architecture that jointly generates part-of-speech tags and lemmatizes sentences of languages with complex morphology, using bidirectional RNNs with character-level and word-level embeddings. We demonstrate that both tasks benefit from sharing the encoding part of the network and from using the tagger output as an input to the lemmatizer. We evaluate our model across several morphologically-rich languages, surpassing state-of-the-art accuracy in both part-of-speech tagging and lemmatization in Czech, German, and Arabic. …

Video to Behaviour (ViBe) google
Learning from demonstration (LfD) is useful in settings where hand-coding behaviour or a reward function is impractical. It has succeeded in a wide range of problems but typically relies on artificially generated demonstrations or specially deployed sensors and has not generally been able to leverage the copious demonstrations available in the wild: those that capture behaviour that was occurring anyway using sensors that were already deployed for another purpose, e.g., traffic camera footage capturing demonstrations of natural behaviour of vehicles, cyclists, and pedestrians. We propose video to behaviour (ViBe), a new approach to learning models of road user behaviour that requires as input only unlabelled raw video data of a traffic scene collected from a single, monocular, uncalibrated camera with ordinary resolution. Our approach calibrates the camera, detects relevant objects, tracks them through time, and uses the resulting trajectories to perform LfD, yielding models of naturalistic behaviour. We apply ViBe to raw videos of a traffic intersection and show that it can learn purely from videos, without additional expert knowledge. …

ConvNetJS google
ConvNetJS is a Javascript library for training Deep Learning models (mainly Neural Networks) entirely in your browser. Open a tab and you’re training. No software requirements, no compilers, no installations, no GPUs, no sweat. …