Probabilistic Programming for Advancing Machine Learning (PPAML) google
Machine learning – the ability of computers to understand data, manage results and infer insights from uncertain information – is the force behind many recent revolutions in computing. Email spam filters, smartphone personal assistants and self-driving vehicles are all based on research advances in machine learning. Unfortunately, even as the demand for these capabilities is accelerating, every new application requires a Herculean effort. Teams of hard-to-find experts must build expensive, custom tools that are often painfully slow and can perform unpredictably against large, complex data sets.
The Probabilistic Programming for Advancing Machine Learning (PPAML) program aims to address these challenges. Probabilistic programming is a new programming paradigm for managing uncertain information. Using probabilistic programming languages, PPAML seeks to greatly increase the number of people who can successfully build machine learning applications and make machine learning experts radically more effective. Moreover, the program seeks to create more economical, robust and powerful applications that need less data to produce more accurate results – features inconceivable with today’s technology.
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Private Incremental Regression google
Data is continuously generated by modern data sources, and a recent challenge in machine learning has been to develop techniques that perform well in an incremental (streaming) setting. In this paper, we investigate the problem of private machine learning, where as common in practice, the data is not given at once, but rather arrives incrementally over time. We introduce the problems of private incremental ERM and private incremental regression where the general goal is to always maintain a good empirical risk minimizer for the history observed under differential privacy. Our first contribution is a generic transformation of private batch ERM mechanisms into private incremental ERM mechanisms, based on a simple idea of invoking the private batch ERM procedure at some regular time intervals. We take this construction as a baseline for comparison. We then provide two mechanisms for the private incremental regression problem. Our first mechanism is based on privately constructing a noisy incremental gradient function, which is then used in a modified projected gradient procedure at every timestep. This mechanism has an excess empirical risk of $\approx\sqrt{d}$, where $d$ is the dimensionality of the data. While from the results of [Bassily et al. 2014] this bound is tight in the worst-case, we show that certain geometric properties of the input and constraint set can be used to derive significantly better results for certain interesting regression problems. …

R-Grams google
This paper introduces a novel type of data-driven segmented unit that we call r-grams. We illustrate one algorithm for calculating r-grams, and discuss its properties and impact on the frequency distribution of text representations. The proposed approach is evaluated by demonstrating its viability in embedding techniques, both in monolingual and multilingual test settings. We also provide a number of qualitative examples of the proposed methodology, demonstrating its viability as a language-invariant segmentation procedure. …

Knowledge-Based MRC google
Machine reading comprehension (MRC) requires reasoning about both the knowledge involved in a document and knowledge about the world. However, existing datasets are typically dominated by questions that can be well solved by context matching, which fail to test this capability. To encourage the progress on knowledge-based reasoning in MRC, we present knowledge-based MRC in this paper, and build a new dataset consisting of 40,047 question-answer pairs. The annotation of this dataset is designed so that successfully answering the questions requires understanding and the knowledge involved in a document. We implement a framework consisting of both a question answering model and a question generation model, both of which take the knowledge extracted from the document as well as relevant facts from an external knowledge base such as Freebase/ProBase/Reverb/NELL. Results show that incorporating side information from external KB improves the accuracy of the baseline question answer system. We compare it with a standard MRC model BiDAF, and also provide the difficulty of the dataset and lay out remaining challenges. …

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