Multi-model and Multi-level Knowledge Distillation (M2KD) google
Incremental learning targets at achieving good performance on new categories without forgetting old ones. Knowledge distillation has been shown critical in preserving the performance on old classes. Conventional methods, however, sequentially distill knowledge only from the last model, leading to performance degradation on the old classes in later incremental learning steps. In this paper, we propose a multi-model and multi-level knowledge distillation strategy. Instead of sequentially distilling knowledge only from the last model, we directly leverage all previous model snapshots. In addition, we incorporate an auxiliary distillation to further preserve knowledge encoded at the intermediate feature levels. To make the model more memory efficient, we adapt mask based pruning to reconstruct all previous models with a small memory footprint. Experiments on standard incremental learning benchmarks show that our method preserves the knowledge on old classes better and improves the overall performance over standard distillation techniques. …

A Swift Approximate Pattern-Miner google
While there has been a tremendous interest in processing data that has an underlying graph structure, existing distributed graph processing systems take several minutes or even hours to mine simple patterns on graphs. This paper presents ASAP, a fast, approximate computation engine for graph pattern mining. ASAP leverages state-of-the-art results in graph approximation theory, and extends it to general graph patterns in distributed settings. To enable the users to navigate the trade-off between the result accuracy and latency, we propose a novel approach to build the Error-Latency Profile (ELP) for a given computation. We have implemented ASAP on a general-purpose distributed dataflow platform, and evaluated it extensively on several graph patterns. Our experimental results show that ASAP outperforms existing exact pattern mining solutions by up to 77×. Further, ASAP can scale to graphs with billions of edges without the need for large clusters. …

Res-SE-Net google
One of the ways to train deep neural networks effectively is to use residual connections. Residual connections can be classified as being either identity connections or bridge-connections with a reshaping convolution. Empirical observations on CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100 datasets using a baseline Resnet model, with bridge-connections removed, have shown a significant reduction in accuracy. This reduction is due to lack of contribution, in the form of feature maps, by the bridge-connections. Hence bridge-connections are vital for Resnet. However, all feature maps in the bridge-connections are considered to be equally important. In this work, an upgraded architecture ‘Res-SE-Net’ is proposed to further strengthen the contribution from the bridge-connections by quantifying the importance of each feature map and weighting them accordingly using Squeeze-and-Excitation (SE) block. It is demonstrated that Res-SE-Net generalizes much better than Resnet and SE-Resnet on the benchmark CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100 datasets. …

Learning Using Statistical Invariants (LUSI) google
This paper introduces a new learning paradigm, called Learning Using Statistical Invariants (LUSI), which is different from the classical one. In a classical paradigm, the learning machine constructs a classification rule that minimizes the probability of expected error; it is data-driven model of learning. In the LUSI paradigm, in order to construct the desired classification function, a learning machine computes statistical invariants that are specific for the problem, and then minimizes the expected error in a way that preserves these invariants; it is thus both data- and invariant-driven learning. From a mathematical point of view, methods of the classical paradigm employ mechanisms of strong convergence of approximations to the desired function, whereas methods of the new paradigm employ both strong and weak convergence mechanisms. This can significantly increase the rate of convergence. …

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