Cross Local Intrinsic Dimensionality (LID) google
Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) are an elegant mechanism for data generation. However, a key challenge when using GANs is how to best measure their ability to generate realistic data. In this paper, we demonstrate that an intrinsic dimensional characterization of the data space learned by a GAN model leads to an effective evaluation metric for GAN quality. In particular, we propose a new evaluation measure, CrossLID, that assesses the local intrinsic dimensionality (LID) of real-world data with respect to neighborhoods found in GAN-generated samples. Intuitively, CrossLID measures the degree to which manifolds of two data distributions coincide with each other. In experiments on 4 benchmark image datasets, we compare our proposed measure to several state-of-the-art evaluation metrics. Our experiments show that CrossLID is strongly correlated with the progress of GAN training, is sensitive to mode collapse, is robust to small-scale noise and image transformations, and robust to sample size. Furthermore, we show how CrossLID can be used within the GAN training process to improve generation quality. …

Context-Aware Detection Network (CAD-Net) google
Accurate and robust detection of multi-class objects in optical remote sensing images is essential to many real-world applications such as urban planning, traffic control, searching and rescuing, etc. However, state-of-the-art object detection techniques designed for images captured using ground-level sensors usually experience a sharp performance drop when directly applied to remote sensing images, largely due to the object appearance differences in remote sensing images in term of sparse texture, low contrast, arbitrary orientations, large scale variations, etc. This paper presents a novel object detection network (CAD-Net) that exploits attention-modulated features as well as global and local contexts to address the new challenges in detecting objects from remote sensing images. The proposed CAD-Net learns global and local contexts of objects by capturing their correlations with the global scene (at scene-level) and the local neighboring objects or features (at object-level), respectively. In addition, it designs a spatial-and-scale-aware attention module that guides the network to focus on more informative regions and features as well as more appropriate feature scales. Experiments over two publicly available object detection datasets for remote sensing images demonstrate that the proposed CAD-Net achieves superior detection performance. The implementation codes will be made publicly available for facilitating future researches. …

Reversible Recurrent Neural Network google
Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) provide state-of-the-art performance in processing sequential data but are memory intensive to train, limiting the flexibility of RNN models which can be trained. Reversible RNNs—RNNs for which the hidden-to-hidden transition can be reversed—offer a path to reduce the memory requirements of training, as hidden states need not be stored and instead can be recomputed during backpropagation. We first show that perfectly reversible RNNs, which require no storage of the hidden activations, are fundamentally limited because they cannot forget information from their hidden state. We then provide a scheme for storing a small number of bits in order to allow perfect reversal with forgetting. Our method achieves comparable performance to traditional models while reducing the activation memory cost by a factor of 10–15. We extend our technique to attention-based sequence-to-sequence models, where it maintains performance while reducing activation memory cost by a factor of 5–10 in the encoder, and a factor of 10–15 in the decoder. …

d-Orientable Deletion google
A graph is $d$-orientable if its edges can be oriented so that the maximum in-degree of the resulting digraph is at most $d$. $d$-orientability is a well-studied concept with close connections to fundamental graph-theoretic notions and applications as a load balancing problem. In this paper we consider the d-ORIENTABLE DELETION problem: given a graph $G=(V,E)$, delete the minimum number of vertices to make $G$ $d$-orientable. We contribute a number of results that improve the state of the art on this problem. Specifically: – We show that the problem is W[2]-hard and $\log n$-inapproximable with respect to $k$, the number of deleted vertices. This closes the gap in the problem’s approximability. – We completely characterize the parameterized complexity of the problem on chordal graphs: it is FPT parameterized by $d+k$, but W-hard for each of the parameters $d,k$ separately. – We show that, under the SETH, for all $d,\epsilon$, the problem does not admit a $(d+2-\epsilon)^{tw}$, algorithm where $tw$ is the graph’s treewidth, resolving as a special case an open problem on the complexity of PSEUDOFOREST DELETION. – We show that the problem is W-hard parameterized by the input graph’s clique-width. Complementing this, we provide an algorithm running in time $d^{O(d\cdot cw)}$, showing that the problem is FPT by $d+cw$, and improving the previously best known algorithm for this case. …