Loss Rank Mining (LRM) google
Modern object detectors usually suffer from low accuracy issues, as foregrounds always drown in tons of backgrounds and become hard examples during training. Compared with those proposal-based ones, real-time detectors are in far more serious trouble since they renounce the use of region-proposing stage which is used to filter a majority of backgrounds for achieving real-time rates. Though foregrounds as hard examples are in urgent need of being mined from tons of backgrounds, a considerable number of state-of-the-art real-time detectors, like YOLO series, have yet to profit from existing hard example mining methods, as using these methods need detectors fit series of prerequisites. In this paper, we propose a general hard example mining method named Loss Rank Mining (LRM) to fill the gap. LRM is a general method for real-time detectors, as it utilizes the final feature map which exists in all real-time detectors to mine hard examples. By using LRM, some elements representing easy examples in final feature map are filtered and detectors are forced to concentrate on hard examples during training. Extensive experiments validate the effectiveness of our method. With our method, the improvements of YOLOv2 detector on auto-driving related dataset KITTI and more general dataset PASCAL VOC are over 5% and 2% mAP, respectively. In addition, LRM is the first hard example mining strategy which could fit YOLOv2 perfectly and make it better applied in series of real scenarios where both real-time rates and accurate detection are strongly demanded. …

Hybrid Contextualized Sentiment Classifier (HCSC) google
The use of user/product information in sentiment analysis is important, especially for cold-start users/products, whose number of reviews are very limited. However, current models do not deal with the cold-start problem which is typical in review websites. In this paper, we present Hybrid Contextualized Sentiment Classifier (HCSC), which contains two modules: (1) a fast word encoder that returns word vectors embedded with short and long range dependency features; and (2) Cold-Start Aware Attention (CSAA), an attention mechanism that considers the existence of cold-start problem when attentively pooling the encoded word vectors. HCSC introduces shared vectors that are constructed from similar users/products, and are used when the original distinct vectors do not have sufficient information (i.e. cold-start). This is decided by a frequency-guided selective gate vector. Our experiments show that in terms of RMSE, HCSC performs significantly better when compared with on famous datasets, despite having less complexity, and thus can be trained much faster. More importantly, our model performs significantly better than previous models when the training data is sparse and has cold-start problems. …

Explore-Exploit google
Interactive user interfaces need to continuously evolve based on the interactions that a user has (or does not have) with the system. This may require constant exploration of various options that the system may have for the user and obtaining signals of user preferences on those. However, such an exploration, especially when the set of available options itself can change frequently, can lead to sub-optimal user experiences. We present Explore-Exploit: a framework designed to collect and utilize user feedback in an interactive and online setting that minimizes regressions in end-user experience. This framework provides a suite of online learning operators for various tasks such as personalization ranking, candidate selection and active learning. We demonstrate how to integrate this framework with run-time services to leverage online and interactive machine learning out-of-the-box. We also present results demonstrating the efficiencies that can be achieved using the Explore-Exploit framework. …

DCSVM google
We present DCSVM, an efficient algorithm for multi-class classification using Support Vector Machines. DCSVM is a divide and conquer algorithm which relies on data sparsity in high dimensional space and performs a smart partitioning of the whole training data set into disjoint subsets that are easily separable. A single prediction performed between two partitions eliminates at once one or more classes in one partition, leaving only a reduced number of candidate classes for subsequent steps. The algorithm continues recursively, reducing the number of classes at each step, until a final binary decision is made between the last two classes left in the competition. In the best case scenario, our algorithm makes a final decision between $k$ classes in $O(\log k)$ decision steps and in the worst case scenario DCSVM makes a final decision in $k-1$ steps, which is not worse than the existent techniques. …

Advertisements