Adversarial Variational Inference and Learning (AVIL) google
Markov random fields (MRFs) find applications in a variety of machine learning areas, while the inference and learning of such models are challenging in general. In this paper, we propose the Adversarial Variational Inference and Learning (AVIL) algorithm to solve the problems with a minimal assumption about the model structure of an MRF. AVIL employs two variational distributions to approximately infer the latent variables and estimate the partition function, respectively. The variational distributions, which are parameterized as neural networks, provide an estimate of the negative log likelihood of the MRF. On one hand, the estimate is in an intuitive form of approximate contrastive free energy. On the other hand, the estimate is a minimax optimization problem, which is solved by stochastic gradient descent in an alternating manner. We apply AVIL to various undirected generative models in a fully black-box manner and obtain better results than existing competitors on several real datasets. …

DC.js google
dc.js is a javascript charting library with native crossfilter support and allowing highly efficient exploration on large multi-dimensional dataset (inspired by crossfilter’s demo). It leverages d3 engine to render charts in css friendly svg format. Charts rendered using dc.js are naturally data driven and reactive therefore providing instant feedback on user’s interaction. The main objective of this project is to provide an easy yet powerful javascript library which can be utilized to perform data visualization and analysis in browser as well as on mobile device. …

HyperDenseNet google
Recently, dense connections have attracted substantial attention in computer vision because they facilitate gradient flow and implicit deep supervision during training. Particularly, DenseNet, which connects each layer to every other layer in a feed-forward fashion, has shown impressive performances in natural image classification tasks. We propose HyperDenseNet, a 3D fully convolutional neural network that extends the definition of dense connectivity to multi-modal segmentation problems. Each imaging modality has a path, and dense connections occur not only between the pairs of layers within the same path, but also between those across different paths. This contrasts with the existing multi-modal CNN approaches, in which modeling several modalities relies entirely on a single joint layer (or level of abstraction) for fusion, typically either at the input or at the output of the network. Therefore, the proposed network has total freedom to learn more complex combinations between the modalities, within and in-between all the levels of abstraction, which increases significantly the learning representation. We report extensive evaluations over two different and highly competitive multi-modal brain tissue segmentation challenges, iSEG 2017 and MRBrainS 2013, with the former focusing on 6-month infant data and the latter on adult images. HyperDenseNet yielded significant improvements over many state-of-the-art segmentation networks, ranking at the top on both benchmarks. We further provide a comprehensive experimental analysis of features re-use, which confirms the importance of hyper-dense connections in multi-modal representation learning. Our code is publicly available at https://…/HyperDenseNet.

CortexNet google
In the past five years we have observed the rise of incredibly well performing feed-forward neural networks trained supervisedly for vision related tasks. These models have achieved super-human performance on object recognition, localisation, and detection in still images. However, there is a need to identify the best strategy to employ these networks with temporal visual inputs and obtain a robust and stable representation of video data. Inspired by the human visual system, we propose a deep neural network family, CortexNet, which features not only bottom-up feed-forward connections, but also it models the abundant top-down feedback and lateral connections, which are present in our visual cortex. We introduce two training schemes – the unsupervised MatchNet and weakly supervised TempoNet modes – where a network learns how to correctly anticipate a subsequent frame in a video clip or the identity of its predominant subject, by learning egomotion clues and how to automatically track several objects in the current scene. Find the project website at https://…/.

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