Encoder Based Lifelong Learning google
This paper introduces a new lifelong learning solution where a single model is trained for a sequence of tasks. The main challenge that vision systems face in this context is catastrophic forgetting: as they tend to adapt to the most recently seen task, they lose performance on the tasks that were learned previously. Our method aims at preserving the knowledge of the previous tasks while learning a new one by using autoencoders. For each task, an under-complete autoencoder is learned, capturing the features that are crucial for its achievement. When a new task is presented to the system, we prevent the reconstructions of the features with these autoencoders from changing, which has the effect of preserving the information on which the previous tasks are mainly relying. At the same time, the features are given space to adjust to the most recent environment as only their projection into a low dimension submanifold is controlled. The proposed system is evaluated on image classification tasks and shows a reduction of forgetting over the state-of-the-art …

DISsimilarity COefficient Networks (DISCO Nets) google
We present a new type of probabilistic model which we call DISsimilarity COefficient Networks (DISCO Nets). DISCO Nets allow us to efficiently sample from a posterior distribution parametrised by a neural network. During training, DISCO Nets are learned by minimising the dissimilarity coefficient between the true distribution and the estimated distribution. This allows us to tailor the training to the loss related to the task at hand. We empirically show that (i) by modeling uncertainty on the output value, DISCO Nets outperform equivalent non-probabilistic predictive networks and (ii) DISCO Nets accurately model the uncertainty of the output, outperforming existing probabilistic models based on deep neural networks. …

Chiller google
Distributed transactions on high-overhead TCP/IP-based networks were conventionally considered to be prohibitively expensive and thus were avoided at all costs. To that end, the primary goal of almost any existing partitioning scheme is to minimize the number of cross-partition transactions. However, with the next generation of fast RDMA-enabled networks, this assumption is no longer valid. In fact, recent work has shown that distributed databases can scale even when the majority of transactions are cross-partition. In this paper, we first make the case that the new bottleneck which hinders truly scalable transaction processing in modern RDMA-enabled databases is data contention, and that optimizing for data contention leads to different partitioning layouts than optimizing for the number of distributed transactions. We then present Chiller, a new approach to data partitioning and transaction execution, which minimizes data contention for both local and distributed transactions. Finally, we evaluate Chiller using TPC-C and a real-world workload, and show that our partitioning and execution strategy outperforms traditional partitioning techniques which try to avoid distributed transactions, by up to a factor of 2 under the same conditions. …