Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) google
In applied statistics, canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) is a multivariate constrained ordination technique that extracts major gradients among combinations of explanatory variables in a dataset. The requirements of a CCA are that the samples are random and independent and that the independent variables are consistent within the sample site and error-free. …

Homographic Adaptation google
This paper presents a self-supervised framework for training interest point detectors and descriptors suitable for a large number of multiple-view geometry problems in computer vision. As opposed to patch-based neural networks, our fully-convolutional model operates on full-sized images and jointly computes pixel-level interest point locations and associated descriptors in one forward pass. We introduce Homographic Adaptation, a multi-scale, multi-homography approach for boosting interest point detection accuracy and performing cross-domain adaptation (e.g., synthetic-to-real). Our model, when trained on the MS-COCO generic image dataset using Homographic Adaptation, is able to repeatedly detect a much richer set of interest points than the initial pre-adapted deep model and any other traditional corner detector. The final system gives rise to strong interest point repeatability on the HPatches dataset and outperforms traditional descriptors such as ORB and SIFT on point matching accuracy and on the task of homography estimation. …

Fast Randomized PCA google
Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used for dimension reduction and embedding of real data in social network analysis, information retrieval, and natural language processing, etc. In this work we propose a fast randomized PCA algorithm for processing large sparse data. The algorithm has similar accuracy to the basic randomized SVD (rPCA) algorithm (Halko et al., 2011), but is largely optimized for sparse data. It also has good flexibility to trade off runtime against accuracy for practical usage. Experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is up to 9.1X faster than the basic rPCA algorithm without accuracy loss, and is up to 20X faster than the svds in Matlab with little error. The algorithm computes the first 100 principal components of a large information retrieval data with 12,869,521 persons and 323,899 keywords in less than 400 seconds on a 24-core machine, while all conventional methods fail due to the out-of-memory issue. …

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