Distributed Data Shuffling google
Data shuffling of training data among different computing nodes (workers) has been identified as a core element to improve the statistical performance of modern large scale machine learning algorithms. Data shuffling is often considered one of the most significant bottlenecks in such systems due to the heavy communication load. Under a master-worker architecture (where a master has access to the entire dataset and only communications between the master and workers is allowed) coding has been recently proved to considerably reduce the communication load. In this work, we consider a different communication paradigm referred to as distributed data shuffling, where workers, connected by a shared link, are allowed to communicate with one another while no communication between the master and workers is allowed. Under the constraint of uncoded cache placement, we first propose a general coded distributed data shuffling scheme, which achieves the optimal communication load within a factor two. Then, we propose an improved scheme achieving the exact optimality for either large memory size or at most four workers in the system. …

Deep Graph Translation google
Inspired by the tremendous success of deep generative models on generating continuous data like image and audio, in the most recent year, few deep graph generative models have been proposed to generate discrete data such as graphs. They are typically unconditioned generative models which has no control on modes of the graphs being generated. Differently, in this paper, we are interested in a new problem named \emph{Deep Graph Translation}: given an input graph, we want to infer a target graph based on their underlying (both global and local) translation mapping. Graph translation could be highly desirable in many applications such as disaster management and rare event forecasting, where the rare and abnormal graph patterns (e.g., traffic congestions and terrorism events) will be inferred prior to their occurrence even without historical data on the abnormal patterns for this graph (e.g., a road network or human contact network). To achieve this, we propose a novel Graph-Translation-Generative Adversarial Networks (GT-GAN) which will generate a graph translator from input to target graphs. GT-GAN consists of a graph translator where we propose new graph convolution and deconvolution layers to learn the global and local translation mapping. A new conditional graph discriminator has also been proposed to classify target graphs by conditioning on input graphs. Extensive experiments on multiple synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and scalability of the proposed GT-GAN. …

Kriging google
In statistics, originally in geostatistics, Kriging or Gaussian process regression is a method of interpolation for which the interpolated values are modeled by a Gaussian process governed by prior covariances, as opposed to a piecewise-polynomial spline chosen to optimize smoothness of the fitted values. Under suitable assumptions on the priors, Kriging gives the best linear unbiased prediction of the intermediate values. Interpolating methods based on other criteria such as smoothness need not yield the most likely intermediate values. The method is widely used in the domain of spatial analysis and computer experiments. The technique is also known as Wiener-Kolmogorov prediction (after Norbert Wiener and Andrey Kolmogorov). The theoretical basis for the method was developed by the French mathematician Georges Matheron based on the Master’s thesis of Danie G. Krige, the pioneering plotter of distance-weighted average gold grades at the Witwatersrand reef complex in South Africa. Krige sought to estimate the most likely distribution of gold based on samples from a few boreholes. The English verb is to krige and the most common noun is Kriging; both are often pronounced with a hard ‘g’, following the pronunciation of the name ‘Krige’.
Spatio-Temporal Kriging in R

Advertisements